Peterson

MIDI Resource System™

OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS


OVERVIEW

The Peterson MIDI Resource System™ is a microprocessor controller system that will output MIDI format note on and note off data in response to key press and release data from any Peterson OrgaPlex™ or Diode Matrix relay, non-Peterson switching system, or touch sensitive (velocity sensing) contacts.

Key data for the MIDI to a division couplers is derived before coupling. Key data for the MIDI on a division@ couplers is derived after coupling. Key data will default to key #25 (middle C) = MIDI Note 60.

The default mode is the non-standard (but generally accepted) Multi Mode (mode 5). Multi Mode has the advantage of recognizing different program changes on each MIDI channel, thus allowing multiple voices to be played from one keyboard. The ability to assign any keyboard to any channel with any program change number 1-128 is made possible with the optional control panel.

All MIDI commands, 31.25K baud rate, opto-isolated MIDI Input and MIDI connector pin-outs comply with MIDI Manufacturers Association (MMA) MIDI Detailed Specification 1.0, Version 4.2 (or the most current).

There is capacity for 72 MIDI Patch settable pistons or 24 MIDI Patch settable stops. The MIDI stops include 16', 8' and 4' pitches, plus melody and bass line stops. Either Pistons or Stops, but not both, must be selected at the time of installation.

Velocity or volume data can be sent in response to the organ's expression shoe(s) position(s). Expression data can be programmed to affect MIDI voices on the Solo, Swell, Great, Choir and Pedal MIDI channels from one or more shoes.

Recording organ stop control information to a MIDI sequencer is accomplished using system exclusive (sysex) codes. Up to 288 organ stop controls and 72 pistons can be encoded with this system. Compatibility of MIDI Sequence files is provided with Allen1 Organs and Rodgers2 Organs. Both of these companies have extensive libraries of prerecorded disks that can be used to play pipe organs using the MIDI Resource System™ and an optional sequencer.

A user's control panel compatible in appearance with other Peterson products is used for the MIDI Resource System™. Refer to Figure 1. This control panel includes rocker switches and LED readouts that can be used to control MIDI devices directly or to program presets.

External control functions (options) for the MIDI Resource System™ include a sustain/sostenuto control input, start/stop/continue switch inputs, Advanced Feature Control Panel, 72 preset piston inputs, 24 settable MIDI stops, set piston input, and six expression shoe inputs (one for each keyboard plus an All Swells). A lock-out input (that can connect to the combination action lock-out) prevents setting of the presets. A MIDI cancel input is also provided.


1 Allen is a registered trademark of Allen Organ Co., Macungie, PA.

2 Rodgers is a registered trademark of Rodgers Instrument Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon.

DETAILS OF MIDI Resource System™ OPERATION

A Basic MIDI Resource System™ is supplied with an output-only extension cable. The control panel is not required for basic operation. This configuration will output or send only on the default MIDI channel numbers. These are: Swell on channel 1; Great on channel 2; Choir on channel 3; Pedal on channel 4 and Solo (top of 4) on channel 5.

This arrangement allows an organist to connect a synthesizer or voice module, preset at the synthesizer to a given voice, and play this voice from any manual. If the synthesizer or voice module permits separate voices on each MIDI channel then multiple voices can be played. Multiple voice modules or synthesizers can be connected and set so each one will respond to a different channel. Consult your synthesizer or voice module instructions for details. This basic system can also be used when a record/play (sequencer) only system is desired.

Organ stop controls in each division to turn the MIDI on can be provided as MIDI to a division (couplers) or MIDI on a division (stops). Consult your organ builder/installer as to the preferred arrangement.

Certain hardware programming is available to tailor the MIDI Resource System™ to meet your needs. This programming should be done by the technician during installation, however, may be changed at any time if necessary. Please consult with your installer regarding any special needs, such as alternate channels, default omni/multi mode selection, sustain/sostenuto and volume/velocity selection. These choices are described in more detail later in this manual.

Some optional External DC controls are available for use even with a basic MIDI Resource System™. (Pistons and MIDI preset stops cannot be used since a control panel is required to program these.) The available controls on a basic system are: Start, Stop, Continue, Tremolo/vibrato, Sustain and Transposer. Refer to the following sections for descriptions of these controls.

Options that are available on the MIDI Resource System™ include:

- Expression Shoe Inputs

- Serial Outputs (for MIDI In and Sequencer capability)

- Control Panel/Control Interface (Required for preset pistons/stops)

- Piston (Presets)/Stop Inputs

- In/Sequencer Out/Instrument Out extension cable

- Sustain/Sostenuto switch

- Touch Sensitive (velocity) key contact system

- External Sequencer - (not manufactured by Peterson)

- Advanced Feature Control Panel

DETAILS OF MIDI OPTIONS

EXPRESSION SHOE(S)

One or more of the MIDI Resource System™'s expression (volume/velocity) inputs can be wired to the organ's expression shoe(s). If the organ has only one shoe, but expression is desired on the Choir and Swell MIDI channels, both inputs may be wired together to the one shoe. DIP switches set during installation will determine whether volume or velocity values are sent for a particular input. If the All Swells input is used, its value is used for all keyboards. If the All Swells and another expression input are both active, the highest value of the two for that keyboard is used. All Swells affects volume (expression) only; channels set for velocity are not affected.

An expression control change is sent after any program change(s) on the channel(s) affected, using the expression value of the manual(s) assigned to that channel. If there are Swell and Choir expression shoes (for example), and the Choir shoe is wired to affect the Choir, Great and Pedal: it should be noted that reassigning the Swell manual to a channel used by the Choir, Great or Pedal will cause both shoes to affect that channel's expression.

CONTROL PANEL

The Control Panel option provides the ability to take advantage of the Multi Mode, MIDI Channel and MIDI Program selections (MIDI Patches), Piston and MIDI stop presets, and MIDI In features.

The operation of the readouts and switches on the control panel is as follows. Refer to Figure 1.

DETAILS OF MIDI CONTROL PANEL DISPLAY

PROGRAM MODE

The general rule for Program mode is that the values displayed are what will be programmed.

When program mode is turned on, 0s are shown in the manual, channel and program number displays. This provides the opportunity to clear any pistons or stops which have been previously set, by pressing and holding the set piston and then pressing the numbered piston to be cleared. Clearing is allowed whenever both channel and program are set to 0s.

Any key pressed will then cause that key=s manual number to be displayed along with that manual=s default channel number. The program number will remain zero. Channel and program numbers can now be changed, if desired, using the switches below the display windows. Subsequent key presses on the same manual, or setting these values into preset stops or pistons, will not change the values displayed.

When activating a preset stop or piston while in the Program mode, the stop=s or piston=s values will ordinarily override and be displayed. The exception is that when Set is active, there will be no change in the display. Layered preset stops or pistons that are activated while in Program mode will flash an L and then display the last values programmed. When layering new values, no L will be displayed unless that preset is re-activated without pressing Set.

If a preset stop or piston is activated and causes the manual number to change, then any subsequent key press on the original keyboard will change only the manual number displayed. Only the first key pressed on a new manual causes the channel and program values to read 0.

USE MODE

The general rule for the Use mode is that the values displayed are for use with the Send button (except that the manual number may also display information about presets).

The Use mode display will show all 0s upon power up. Any key pressed then changes the manual number display to that keyboard=s number. Program and channel numbers remain zero. Channel and program numbers can now be changed, if desired, using the switches below the display windows. Subsequent key presses on the same manual, or pressing the Send button, will not reset any of these values. Pressing the Send button transmits the values displayed.

Once a patch is sent on a keyboard, subsequent key presses on that keyboard will ordinarily cause the same values to be displayed again. However, if the keyboard=s channel was over-written by another send or preset, channel and program values of 0 will be displayed again.

When layered presets are activated while in Use mode, the display will show an L in manual and -s (dashes) in channel and program windows. When blank presets are activated, the display shows 0 in manual and -s (dashes) in channel and program windows. After pressing a key and the "send" button, if a preset is activated that changes the manual number, a subsequent key press on the original manual will restore the display to its sent values. Only the first key press on a new manual causes the channel and program windows to display "0".

SHOW MODE

The general rule for Show mode is to display the values for the last control (preset piston, preset stop or send button) that was activated.

If more than one preset stop is on at a time, only the value(s) of the last one activated will be displayed. If a preset piston or preset stop has layered values (patches) an L will be momentarily displayed when it is activated (indicating more values to follow). Activating a blank preset displays all 0s.

When values displayed are from the send button, all decimal points are illuminated to distinguish these values. It is helpful to know where these values are from if one or more preset stop(s) is also on.

DETAILS OF MIDI CONTROL PANEL SWITCHES

1. Off/On/ANO - This is a 3 position rocker switch (on/off/momentary) with ANO being momentary. Off is off; the readouts are not lighted and all MIDI functions and modes are disabled. On enables all MIDI functions/modes and lights the readouts. ANO (All Notes Off) clears all Key On data on all channels by sending ANO code and by sending each note with a velocity of zero. All OrgaPlex™ Serial Outputs, including stops, are also cleared. This is like a reset for use in the event that a MIDI note ciphers on.

2. Prog/Use/Show - This is a 3 position rocker switch (on/on/on). Program enables setting of the preset pistons/stops. The MIDI output does not respond to control panel changes until the set (or send) button is activated. The displayed settings and MIDI values will change when a preset is pushed. The up/down buttons will then start from these values. Use will display the current value or values from a preset and allow changing of channel and program values immediately when a preset is activated. Values adjusted using the control panel switches will only be sent when the Send button is pressed (acting as an enter key). In the Use mode if presets are layered an L is displayed in the manual display. Show will cause readouts to display all values for the last preset pressed and disable all control panel changes. If more than one manual, channel or program value is stored on a given preset, the readouts will step through and show all values at a one per half second rate. Discrete LEDs are lighted when the Program or Show functions are active. Show is also used when selecting a stop control/sequencer format. Refer to the section on Details of MIDI Sequence Files found later in this manual.

3. Channel Up/Down - This is a 3 position rocker switch (momentary/off/momentary) which increments or decrements the channel value by one per push. If pushed and held for more than 1 second, the value will change and then sequence automatically at a 4 per second rate. The range of values is normally 0-16. However, a range 0-24 can be activated with the +8 feature (See Additional Features Section for more details).

4. Program Up/Down - This is a 3 position rocker switch (momentary/off/momentary) which increments or decrements the program value by one per push. If pushed and held for more than 1 second, the value will change and then sequence automatically at a 4 per second rate. The range of values is 0-128 and a position for Bank Select which is detailed in Additional Features Section.

5. Send/Receive - This is a 3 position rocker switch (momentary/off/momentary) used to select the programming of presets. With Send selected (in the Program mode) presets are programmed with the channel/program numbers to be sent out. With Receive selected (in the Program mode) pistons and/or tabs are assigned to respond to received program numbers. Normally, both MIDI OUT (send) and MIDI IN (receive) are both active. The programming with these will be covered in more detail in the presets section. Separate LEDs are lighted to indicate if the Send or Receive function is active. Both these LEDs are off when in Use mode.

6. Tuning - This is an analog rotary potentiometer that will send MIDI Pitch Bend values. The center is equal to A=440. Turning the knob clockwise tunes the synthesizer sharp and turning it counter clockwise tunes it flat. The range is approximately +/- 35 cents (hundredths of a semitone). This is used to tune the synthesizer or voice module to the pipes. Note: Some voice modules and/or synthesizers do not respond to pitch bend but may be tuneable at the device. Refer to the manual of your particular device.

7. Program Readout - This is a 2-1/2 digit 7 segment LED display for current program value 1-128; (1-128 = MIDI 0-127). The value displayed will be from the last preset, up/down button press or received program value. In the Show mode the program value for each channel, if more than one, will be displayed in an automatic step fashion. The current bank A or B is displayed between 1 and 128 (the bank select feature is covered later). The 0 in this display is used when clearing MIDI preset pistons.

8. Channel Readout - This is a 1-1/2 digit 7 segment LED display. The channel number displayed shows the most current channel value 0-16 (0 = Omni (all channels); 1-16 = MIDI 0-15), from the last preset, up/down button press or received channel number. The 0 is also used when clearing MIDI preset pistons.

9. Manual Readout - This is a 1 digit 7 segment LED display. In the Show mode the Manual value (1-7) shows the most current value from the last preset. The values displayed are as follows: 1=Swell, 2=Great, 3=Choir, 4=Pedal, 5=Solo or other top-of-4th manual, 6=Antiphonal and 7=Echo. In the Program mode the Manual value shows the last manual a key was played on, and is the value (manual) that will be stored in a preset (when set is activated in the Program mode). If more than one manual is being played, the first one read by the microprocessor is displayed. The manual readout also displays information about presets. If a preset is activated but has not been programmed, a zero will be displayed. If a preset is programmed with more than one channel or program number (layered), then an L is displayed when in the Use mode. (The layered information indicated by the L can be viewed by using the Show mode.)

PISTONS/MIDI PRESET STOPS

The Piston/Stop board (#404587) and Control Panel are required to take advantage of the piston and MIDI preset stop inputs. The operation of these presets in conjunction with the control panel is as follows:

1. Setting - Requires the MIDI to be on, the Prog/Use/Show to be in Program and the lock-out(s) to be off. (The Send/Receive function will default to Send when Program mode is selected.) Displayed values are captured on a desired piston by holding that piston (or turning on the desired MIDI stop) and then pressing the set piston. In the case of a General piston affecting more than one manual, each manual's values will have to be layered on (added to) the preset by adjusting the displayed values, holding the piston again and then pressing the set piston again. The manual value can be changed by pressing any key(s) on the desired manual. The new manual value will be displayed and settable. Multi mode allows any keyboard to have different voices (program numbers) on each channel so one manual can play more than one voice (some sound modules do not support this mode). If more than one program number is set on a particular channel the last one set will be used.

Note: It is recommended that MIDI channels 9-16 be used for sound module synthesizer voices, especially when a sequencer is used. MIDI channels 1-8 are reserved for use as control of organ only. Synthesizer sounds on these MIDI channels will not appear to respond to stop control (always on).

To clear a piston, press and hold it, and then press the MIDI cancel piston. Cancel only clears piston or MIDI stop memories when in the Program mode. Alternately a piston or preset can be cleared (while in program mode) by setting both the channel and program number displays to 0 and then pressing set and the desired piston.

Setting can also be accomplished using the Hold and Set feature. This is done by holding a piston for more than 2 seconds (in Program mode). This automatically activates the set function. The display will momentarily blank out when set is activated in this fashion. New values are written on the release of the piston in this case, and the display will momentarily display Set when the piston is released.

NOTE: 24 pistons are allowed to be layered with up to a total of 16 channelseach. These are normally used forGeneral and Tutti pistons. 48 pistons are allowed to be layered with up to 2 channels each. These are normally used for Divisional pistons. All pistons have 99 memory levels available. Also see the Advanced Features section for information on assigning received program change values to pistons or stops.

If duplicate patch values are inadvertently attempted to be programmed (layered) on a piston, the message dupe is displayed. When the maximum number of allowed layers are exceeded the message full will be displayed. Blank pistons are indicated by 0s being displayed in all the control panel read-outs.

Setting is not allowed if the manual, channel or program number is zero (0) or if the program number read-out is displaying the bank letter.

2. Recall - Any piston or MIDI preset stop activated will display it's stored values in the control panel readouts and output those values on the appropriate MIDI channels.

Layered pistons are indicated by an L in the manual window when in the Use mode. These layered values can be viewed by switching to the Show mode. Blank pistons are indicated by 0's in the manual, channel and program number windows when in the Use mode.

Blank pistons/preset stops can be configured during installation to either cancel the MIDI Instrument (default) or to have no effect. Advise your installer of your preferred arrangement.

3. MIDI Cancel - The MIDI cancel input will cause the MIDI to stop playing for any notes held. Also new notes will not be played until a new program number (patch) is sent. MIDI cancel does not affect preset tabs that are on unless the MIDI cancel is connected to the combination action general cancel.

The MIDI Resource SystemJ powers up in a cancelled state, i.e. no key data is sent to the instrument out port until a patch change is sent. Basic systems without a control panel power up in an active state using the default channels.

If more than one piston is pushed at a time the first one that is seen by the microprocessor will be the active one. If the first one is then released while the second one is still held, the second will become active.

If more than one preset stop is being used and they are programmed with the same Keyboard/MIDI channel, the program value of the last one activated will be used. Thus some stop changes could over-ride previous stops even though that stop is still on. However, if the over-riding stop is then canceled and the previous stop is still on, it's program value is restored on it's channel.

OrgaPlex™ SERIAL OUTPUT/MIDI IN

This option requires an OrgaPlex™ Serial Output Board (#404590) to be installed. MIDI In data is sent to the OrgaPlex™ Serial outputs. The OrgaPlex™ Serial data is used to play the organ's keys, stops and expression. Thus a MIDI Sequencer connected to the MIDI Resource System™'s MIDI In can act as a pipe organ player. See the section on Details of MIDI Sequencing later in this manual.

MIDI In data received from channels 1-8 are assigned to the organ specifically and cannot be reassigned. These assignments are as follows:

1. Swell keys Solo

2. Great keys Great

3. Choir keys Accomp.

4. Pedal keys Pedal

5. Solo keys (top of 4 manuals) Bombarde

6. Antiphonal keys Accomp. 2nd

7. Echo keys Great 2nd

8. General controls General controls

MIDI In data received on channels 9-16 are copied (merged) with Instrument Out channels 9-16. These channels must be used when a MIDI Instrument is required with organ in a sequence. These channels may be assigned (mapped) to any keyboard as desired.

MIDI IN/SEQUENCER OUT/INSTRUMENT OUT

Extension cables and a mounting bracket/plate can be provided to allow the installer to mount the MIDI In/Sequencer Out/Instrument Out receptacles in the back of the console or under the key bed. This permits convenient access to the MIDI cables if cable swapping needs to be done.

See Figure 2 for some examples of interconnecting voice modules, a sequencer and/or a PC using the MIDI In/Sequencer Out/Instrument Out ports. In some cases, multiple MIDI devices may require additional Merge and/or Thru adapters to interconnect all devices. Chaining more than three MIDI devices via MIDI Thru connectors is not recommended. Accumulated delays can cause problems. If needed, MIDI Thru Boxes that provide multiple outputs are available. Additional information on interconnecting MIDI devices may be found in the instruction manuals of the MIDI devices you are using.

Typically the Sequencer's output connects to the MIDI Resource SystemJ In. Optionally a remote MIDI keyboard's output could connect to the MIDI Resource SystemJ In.

The MIDI Resource SystemJ Sequencer Out connects to the input of the sequencer. Note: This output does not transmit MIDI codes for "PitchBend" and channels 1-7 (dedicated to organ only) do not cancel with MIDI cancel. Therefore if a MIDI Instrument were connected to this output, remote tuning would not work and channels 1-7 would play all the time.

The MIDI Resource SystemJ Instrument Output connects to synthesizer or sound module. Note: This output does not transmit System Exclusive (Sysex) data from organ stops.

SUSTAIN/SOSTENUTO

The sustain/sostenuto control can optionally be supplied as a skate clamp switch. A toe stud or similar control can also be supplied. When activated, a Sustain control code (Bn 40 7Fh) is sent on all MIDI channels. If preferred, a Sostenuto control code (Bn 42 7Fh) can be sent on all MIDI channels. The preferred use is programmed by the installer during set-up.

START/STOP/CONTINUE

Pistons buttons (or other controls of the purchaser's choice) can be installed for this feature. These controls are useful for operating a MIDI Sequencer or other Real Time MIDI device. Additional information on use of these controls with MIDI devices may be found in the manuals of the MIDI devices you are using.

TOUCH (VELOCITY) SENSITIVE CONTACTS (not available at this time)

This option uses a variation of the Peterson Master Touch contact assembly and a slave microprocessor controller board that measures key travel time. This measurement is then converted to velocity data which is sent along with the Note On codes.

ADVANCED FEATURE CONTROL PANEL

Includes momentary switches (buttons) for: Mode Select, Basic Channel Select, Start, Stop, Continue, Memory Dump and Memory Select. This control panel may also include a 2 digit, seven segment readout for the memory level. A detailed description of each function follows:

Mode Select - Used to change the MIDI Mode of operation. The Modes available in the MIDI Resource System™ are: Mode 1 = Omni On, Poly; Mode 3 = Omni Off, Poly; Mode 5 = Multi Mode. To change the Mode, activate the Mode Select switch and then using the Channel Select Up/Down buttons, select 1, 3 or 5 (in the Channel Window). Then press Send or Receive to select whether this mode is sent on the basic channel to change an external device or to set the MIDI Resource System™'s mode of operation. Note: Some voice modules may not recognize received mode messages.

Basic Channel Select - Used to set the MIDI Basic Channel which is used to receive Channel Mode Messages and Control Change Messages when Omni is off. To change the Basic Channel activate the Basic Channel Select switch and then use the Channel Select Up/Down buttons to select the desired channel 1-16 (in the Channel Window). Then press Receive to set the MIDI Resource System™'s basic channel of operation. The Basic Channel of each other MIDI device must be changed at that device. Refer to the manual of that device for information on how this is done.

Start - Used to control and synchronize external real time devices such as sequencers. Pressing the Start button sends a code to start a device, usually at it's beginning. Refer to the instruction manual of the device to be controlled for further information.

Stop - Used to control and synchronize external real time devices such as sequencers. Pressing the Stop button sends a code to stop a device. Refer to the instruction manual of the device to be controlled for further information.

Continue - Used to control and synchronize external real time devices such as sequencers. Pressing the Continue button sends a code, usually to restart a device from where it was stopped. Refer to the instruction manual of the device to be controlled for further information.

Memory Select (Up/Down) - Used to select the memory level (1-99) of the MIDI Resource System™'s settable pistons if the memory select is not connected to the organ's combination action memory select switch. Momentarily pushing the Up or Down switch will increment or decrement the memory level by one. Pushing and holding one of these switches will cause the memory level to begin incrementing or decrementing in an automatic stepping fashion. The current memory level is displayed in the Memory Level Readout described below.

Memory Level Readout - Used to display the current memory level (1-99) of the MIDI Resource System™'s settable pistons. This is a two digit, 7 segment LED display. This display is controlled by the Memory Select Up/Down switches described above.

TRANSPOSER

This is used to transpose MIDI data to track the organ's transposer. The transposer selector switch can provide a -6 to +6 semitone range. In most installations this MIDI transposer switch is connected to the organ's transposer switch.

EXTERNAL SEQUENCER

Sequencers manufactured by other companies are available from Peterson, or we can recommend suitable sequencers that may be purchased locally.

Refer to your sequencer's instruction manual for details of its operation and to the following section on details of MIDI sequencing.

ADDITIONAL FEATURES

BANK SELECT

Some voice modules and synthesizers have more than 128 voices or may permit external voice memory (expansion) cards. Only 128 voices can be addressed by program change values. To access additional voices a bank select is used which moves the 128 program change values to another set of voices. The MIDI Resource System™ allows selecting MIDI banks 0-127. This is done by using the program change up/down button and incrementing or decrementing the program number display between 1 and 128. At this point the letter b (lower case) displays in the manual #1 window. While this is displayed, pressing the send/receive selects the value of the bank # transmits this value on the selected channel. Bank 0 is always activated when power is turned on.

CHANNELS +8 FEATURE

In the normal mode of operation, MIDI channels 1-16 can be mapped (assigned) to play from any keyboard to the Instrument Output Port and MIDI channels 9-16 are copied to the Sequencer Output Port channels 9 -16, thus allowing MIDI Instrument(s) to be Sequenced (recorded) along with the organ.

With the +8 feature active, the Control Panel Numbers will range from 1-24. With 1-16 being related to the Instrument Output Port (as above) and 17-24 being used for 9-16 of the Sequencer Output Port. This would allow two MIDI Instruments to be connected (one to the Instrument Out and the other to the Sequencer Out) with each being controlled separately for a total of 24 MIDI channels for MIDI Instruments. In this case when Sequencer playback (MIDI In) data from channels 9-16 is copied to Instrument Out 9-16 and Sequencer Out 9-16, care must be taken in the assignment of MIDI Instruments recorded with the organ.

This feature is most useful when control of two MIDI Instruments is desired. Just keep in mind which instrument the Sequencer is using.

If this feature is desired, the installer/technician should be advised as a hardware change is required to enable this feature.

ASSIGNING RECEIVE PROGRAM CHANGE VALUES

This feature is used to assign a received program change to activate stops or a piston on the organ thus allowing a remote MIDI keyboard controller to control the organ's registration.

To assign received program numbers to pistons or stops;

a. Select the MIDI Resource System™'s Program and Receive modes.

b. Adjust the displayed values on the MIDI Resource System™'s control panel for the desired MIDI receive channel number and receive program number using the Channel Up/Down and Program Up/Down buttons.

c. Push and hold the desired piston or turn on the desired organ stop(s) and then press the set piston.

d. Repeat the above process for any desired receive program values.

e. Return the MIDI Resource System™ to the Use Mode.

The assigned program value(s), when received on the assigned MIDI In channel(s) will now activate the piston or stop control(s).

AUTO RESEND

This is an exclusive feature of the Peterson MIDI Resource SystemJ . MIDI normally only transmits data at the instant of a change. Therefore, on playback of sequencer files one must rewind to the beginning of a file, before any registration changes occurred, to assure proper playback.

When enabled, the Auto Resend feature immediately re-transmits all organ data to the Sequencer Output and then at regular intervals. This permits rewinding to any place in a file on playback. Stops, expression and keys will be restored properly within the preselected time interval (selected during installation). Also, if a momentary button is used, this feature could be used to cue stop and expression data when starting a recording.

This can be an extremely useful feature in some applications, however, there are some drawbacks. Re-sending data does use more sequencer memory and disk (file) space. The shorter the interval is, the more memory/disk space is required. Also if percussive type sounds (piano, harp, chimes, etc.) from a synthesizer were recorded with the Auto Resend feature active, these voices may re-strike (at the resend interval) on playback. This Phenomenon only occurs with synthesizer voices, not with real electrically or pneumatically operated voices. Therefore, the interval time and the use of this feature should be used judiciously. We recommend it's use only with organ type sounds.

DETAILS OF MIDI SEQUENCING

One of the many useful features of the MIDI Resource System™ is the ability to add an optional sequencer and make MIDI sequence (player) files. Even more useful is the fact that the MIDI Resource System™ can play MIDI sequence files in several formats allowing compatibility with Allen1 Organs and Rodgers2 Organ sequence files. Both of these companies offer extensive libraries of pre-recorded MIDI disks that can be used to play your pipe organ.

It should be noted though, that not all sequencer file disks are directly interchangeable. The MIDI data contained on them is compatible but the storage format used by various sequencers is not. Much like computer disks, an Apple disk won't work on an IBM and vice versa. This is unfortunate but true. Therefore, when exchanging MIDI files you need to know the type of sequencer the file was made on too.

Peterson supplies Yamaha MDF II MIDI Data Filers, which we have found to have adequate capacity and are relatively easy to use. The MDF II records data in MIDI Format 0 Files. These files are compatible with many of the newer sequencers and software now available.

Other sequencers vary in the amount of memory available, their features and in other ways. However, any sequencer can be used with the MIDI Resource System™. In fact, for those that want to do a lot of file swapping, more than one sequencer (of different brands) could be connected to the MIDI Resource System™.

In regards to sequencer (player) disk storage capacity, a 2 Sided Double Density 3.5" floppy (used with the Yamaha MDF II) will accommodate aproximately 80,000 notes (on and off). If one assumes 120 notes played per minute (without expression changes), there would be 328 minutes or almost 5 1/2 hours of music capacity. If one continuously pumped the expression shoe and made frequent large stop changes there might only be 20 minutes of music capacity on a disk. In actual use we have found that recordings of 125 major works (each 2-15 minutes) will fit on a single disk. Another disk has been recorded with 50 hymn tunes of 2-6 minutes each. Each of these include typical registration changes and moderate use of expression.

PLAYBACK of pre-recorded sequence files:

Connect a MIDI cable from the MIDI Resource System™'s MIDI In connector to the sequencer's MIDI Out connector. Insert the MIDI sequence file disk into the sequencer and follow the instructions for that sequencer to load and play (sequence) the file(s). The MIDI Resource System™ will determine if the file is a Peterson, Allen1, or Rodgers2, format and automatically adapt for stop handling. Stops must first be assigned using the desired stop list; Peterson, Allen1 or Rodgers2. See stop assignment section.

Bear in mind that MIDI sequencers record event changes (i.e. key on, key off, stop on, stop off, etc.). Therefore, be sure to start playing a file (song) from it's beginning. Otherwise, stop registration changes may be missed and the organ would appear to not be playing (until the next registration change). Also see Auto Resend section.

NOTE: Sequence files other than Peterson, Allen1 Organ and Rodgers2 Organ may not be compatible in regards to stops and expression. The key data of any sequence file will play keys, although manual assignments may be different. If this is the case, even these files can be played by manually registering stops and re-assigning the manual/channel assignments.

Stop registrations that are incompatible can be turned off with an optional external control or the Advanced Feature Control Panel that activivate the All Stops Off Feature.

RECORDING or making of sequence files:

Connect a MIDI cable from the MIDI Resource System™'s MIDI Sequencer Out connector to the sequencer's MIDI In connector. Insert a blank (or formatted) file disk into the sequencer and follow the instructions for that sequencer to put it into the record mode. Then select and follow the procedure for one of the following formats. Bear in mind that MIDI sequencers record event changes (i.e. key on, key off, stop on, stop off, etc). Therefore, one should begin a recording session with all stops, keys, etc off. Put the sequencer in record (wait for any count down timers) then register stops (including MIDI stops), then begin playing. Also see Auto Resend section. Since organ key data is transmitted and received on MIDI channels 1-8, when recording sound module voices along with the organ be sure to use channels 9-16 for this purpose.

PETERSON STOP CONTROL FORMAT (default)

If no other action is taken, key data from the MIDI Resource System™ will be output to the sequencer and recorded in the standard note on, note off manner using the default MIDI channel assignments. Do not re-assign manuals/channels when making compatible sequence files. The organ's stop controls will be recorded using the Peterson Sysex Format.

In order for stops to match another organ's stops the Stop Assignment step must have been performed. This Stop Assignment will provide compatibility of stops, even between organs with different stop lists. Refer to the section of this manual for details of the Stop Assignment. The Peterson Universal Stop Assignment List (MAP) must be used in conjunction with the Peterson Format.

For those organists who are seriously interested in exchanging sequencer (player) files with other organists, it would be a good idea to make a copy of your organ's stop list and note the assigned stop values that were used. Supplying this notated list along with the sequencer data will provide the opportunity for others to re-assign their stops for an even better match in stop registration. See description of the Peterson Sysex Format found at the end of this manual for greater details of how stops are handled.

PETERSON DEFAULT CHANNEL ASSIGNMENTS:

1. Swell Solo

2. Great Great

3. Choir Accomp.

4. Pedal Pd/Pd 2

5. Solo Bombard

6. Antiphonal Accomp 2

7. Echo Great 2

8. Generals

Channels 1-7 are the standard assignments for organ dedicated channels and Channels 9-16 are available for recording MIDI Instruments along with the organ. Be sure to assign any desired MIDI sounds using these channels.

ALLEN1 ORGAN FORMAT

It is first necessary to re-assign MIDI channels to the Choir and Pedal manuals. Only these Manual/Channel assignments should be used to maintain full compatibility. Allen1 Organ channel assignments are:

Classical Theatre

1. Swell (Base) Great (3m) Solo (2m)

2. Great Accomp

3. Pedal Pedal

4. Choir Solo (3m)

5. Solo (4th) Accomp 2nd touch

6. 5th Manual ----

7. ---- ----

8. General Pistons General Pistons

The Allen1 format is selected by turning on the Show Mode, and then pressing the Program Up and Channel Up buttons together. This selection will be confirmed by the Program number read-out displaying all (for Allen1).

The format selection button sequence described above needs to be done at the beginning of each MIDI sequence file disk. (It does not need to be done at the beginning of each piece on that disk). Use of this format requires that the organ stops be assigned, using the Allen1 Organ Company's Master List of stops.

RODGERS2 ORGAN FORMAT

It is first necessary to re-assign MIDI channels to all of the manuals. Only these Manual/Channel assignments should be used to maintain full compatibility. Rodgers2 Organ channel assignments are:

12. Great

13. Swell

14. Pedal

15. Choir

16. Solo

The Rodgers2 format is selected by turning on the Show Mode, and then pressing the Channel Down and Program Down buttons together. This selection will be confirmed by the Program number read-out displaying rod (for Rodgers2).

This format selection button sequence described above needs to be done at the beginning of each MIDI sequence file disk (It does not need to be done at the beginning of each piece on that disk). Use of this format requires that the organ stops be assigned, during installation, using the Rodgers2 Instrument Corporation Stop Sysex Code ssignments list. Note: The stop assignment procedure only needs to be done once, during the installation and set-up.

STOP CONTROL ASSIGNMENTS

This step should be performed to prepare the MIDI Resource System™ for compatibility with the desired sequencer (recording) format. This permits pre-recorded sequences of music to be replayed using the proper stop registration. It also permits recording sequences that will then be playable on other instruments, even if their stop lists are not the same.

The Peterson MIDI Resource System™ supports compatibility with three possible formats. These formats are:

1. Peterson (default) format

2. Allen1 Organ format (Will be available in the future with software update).

3. Rodgers2 Organ format (Will be available in the future with software update).

The Allen1 and Rodgers2 formats were chosen because of these companies' proven experience in recording with their respective formats and to allow taking advantage of their vast libraries of pre-recorded music. If compatibility with either of these formats or with any other instrument is not required, the default Peterson

format can be used. We highly recommend choosing one format and assigning stops to maintain compatibility with other instruments. In some cases where stop compatibility is not required it may be desirable to achieve the maximum speed in stop handling (to avoid delays) by using the Peterson format Fast Config assignment (See below).

Once the desired format is chosen refer to the corresponding Stop List (Peterson, Allen1 or Rodgers2) located at the end of this manual for the stop assignments.

Turn the organ power off, then while holding down the show, channel down, program down and receive buttons on the Control Panel, turn the power back on. This puts the MIDI Resource System™ in it's Assign Stops Mode. Note: Normal MIDI functions do not work in this mode. Next, turn on one stop and use the Program Up/Down button to set the Program Number to the reference number associated with that stop from the desired Stop List. Use the Channel Up/Down to set the division number in the Channel read-out. 1=Swell, 2=Great, 3=Choir, 4=Pedal, 5=Solo, 6=Antiphonal, 7=Echo and 8=generals and intermanual couplers.

Now press the Send button to store the division number and stop number for the stop that is turned on. Repeat this process for every stop control on the organ. The values assigned to a stop can be viewed by switching to Show mode. Turn stops on, one at a time, assigned values. If E EE EEE is displayed when setting, an error has occurred. Usually this means more than one stop is on. When set is displayed the values have been written to memory. An S (looks like 5) is displayed in the manual read-out when in the show mode of assign stops. In a similar manner, each numbered piston must be assigned to its division (Not required for Peterson format). Again use the Channel Up/Down button and read-out to select the division. Then hold the Send button and push each piston in that division, one at a time, to store them.

After all the stops and pistons have been assigned, it is a good idea to switch to the show mode and examine each stop to be sure they are programmed. Any that show - -- --- were overwritten from a duplicate setting. Choose a new value and reprogram that stop. Finally, turn off the Assign Stops dip switch and again reset the MIDI Resource System™ by turning the organ power off and on as above, to return to normal operation.

Fast Config. Assignment (Available in Peterson format only.)

Follow the procedure above but rather than using the Stop List values, assign sequential numbers to the stops in each division. Start with the value one for the first stop of the Swell (division 1), two for the second stop, etc. (Values up to 299 are valid). Change to the Great division (number 2) and repeat the process starting with number one again. Follow this procedure until all stops have been assigned. This "Fast config." sequential assignment is automatically done on systems as shipped from Peterson. The only exception to sequential assignment is that MIDI On/Off controls on each division must be asigned #35. The MIDI Resource SystemJ uses this #35 to control data to the instrument output.

ADVANCED SEQUENCING

Most sequencers (hardware or software based) have many features built in that organists can put to good use. These include: Multi-Track recording capability, quantizing, scoring and editing. Multi-Track recording allows layering of data on the 16 MIDI channels which can be used, for example, to create four (or more) handed pieces or build orchestral ensembles. The quantizing can automatically align notes in synchronization with a fraction of a metronome beat. The editing can be used to fix mistakes or embellish already recorded music. Refer to the operating manual of the sequencer device you are using for details.

Also available are PC programs for scoring music played via MIDI. These programs can also be used to edit and embellish music and then sequence (replay) the altered version. Peterson distributes Finale by Coda and "Cakewalk Professional" by Twelves Tones for this purpose. Feel free to contact Peterson for more details about this software.





ADDITIONAL REFERENCES

For those organists interested in learning more about MIDI, how it works, how to get the most out of it and what it's limitations are, there are a number of books available. One source is the International MIDI Association (IMA). The IMA carries books such as: The MIDI Book, MIDI: the Ins, Outs and Thrus and Taking the Mystery Out of MIDI. The IMA can be reach at: 5316 West 57th Street, Los Angeles, CA. 90056, or by phone 1(310) 649-6434. Similar books are available at local music stores and bookstores.

MIDI IMPLEMENTATION DETAILS of the MIDI Resource System

1. See MIDI Implementation Chart (located later in this manual) for additional information.

2. Running status is used whenever possible to reduce MIDI overhead. A timer is used to re-assert status bytes after 3 seconds if no new key on/off data is detected.

3. If velocity keying is not implemented a velocity value 40H is sent for Note On.

4. Note Off data uses Note On - Velocity 0 (9n 00h) for Note Off to avoid changing status. Key Off codes (8n h) are recognized though.

5. Pitch Bend (En DD DDh) is transmitted when the tuning pot on the Control Panel is changed.

6. Control change (Bn 07h) is transmitted for expression shoe changes on the MIDI channel(s) that a particular shoe is to affect. Note: Alternately expression shoe data can be sent as velocity value for note on.

7. Control change (Bn 64h or Bn 66h) is transmitted on all channels for sustain or sostenuto.

8. Program changes (Cn DDh) 0-127 transmitted and can be user defined on receive.

9. Sysex (ID# 00 00 57) is used for Peterson format organ stop control data. See section on Description

of Peterson Sysex Format for details.

10. All Notes Off - Follows MMA recommended procedures (see Pages 30 and 59) of MIDI 1.0 Detailed Specification.

11. The Basic Channel for receiving Mode Messages is channel #1. This can be re-assigned by the user.

12. Multi Mode allows each MIDI channel to be polyphonic and have its own voice(s) controlled by program change commands.

13. There are five 16' and five 4' MIDI Preset (stops) for which the note data is offset by one octave (up for 4' - down for 16').

14. Instrument output port excludes sysex data. Key on/off data is inhibited by MIDI cancel until a new program (patch) change is transmitted.

15. Sequence output port filters trem/vibrato data, pitch bend data and MIDI cancel has no effect on key on/off data for channels 1-8.

16. Tremolo control transmits MIDI code Cn 5C FFh and control 99/98 sequence to send Allen tremolo codes.

17. Bank Select transmits Cn 00 MSB, 20 LSB sequence. (LSB values 0 - 127 used)

















MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART

MODEL: PETERSON MIDI Resource System Version: V1.54 Date: 3-27-96

FUNCTION TRANSMITTED RECOGNIZED REMARKS

DEFAULT CHANNEL 1=Sw 2=Gt 3=Ch 1=Sw 2=Gt 3=Ch User Configurable

4=Pd 5=So (4th) 4=Pd 5=So (4th)

6=Antiphonal 7=Echo 6=Antiphonal 7=Echo

9-16 Mappable 9-16 Mappable

MODE Yes Yes Modes supported:

1, 3, Multi

NOTE NUMBER 24-108 24-108

VELOCITY Note On Yes No User selected. Sent Note Off No No instead of (expression)

Master Volume

AFTER Keys No No

TOUCH Channels No No

PITCH BEND Yes No

CONTROL 0 Yes No

CHANGE 7 Yes Yes Ch.1=Sw Ch.2=Gt Ch.3=Ch

Ch.4=Pd Ch.5=So

32 Yes No

64 Yes No User Selected

66 Yes No User Selected

92 Yes No

98 Yes Yes Stop Control 99 Yes Yes Stop Control




PROGRAM CHANGE 0-127 0-127

SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE Yes Yes Sysex ID # 00 00 57h

Note 1

SYSTEM Song Position No No

COMMON Song Select No No

Tune No No

SYSTEM

REAL TIME

Local On/Off No No

All-Notes-Off Yes Yes

Active Sense No No

Reset No No

Start Yes No

Stop Yes No

Continue Yes No

Notes:

1. Also recognize Allen1 Organ sysex ID # 00 00 35h, Rodgers2 (Roland) sysex ID # 41h

2. MIDI channels 17-24 optionally available using sequencer output port.

Mode 1: Omni On, Poly Mode 2: Omni On, Mono

Mode 3: Omni Off, Poly Mode 4; Omni Off, Mono


1 Allen is a registered trademark of Allen Organ Co., Macungie, PA.

2 Rodgers is a registered trademark of Rodgers Instrument Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon.




DESCRIPTION OF PETERSON SYSEX FORMAT (Peterson's SYSEX ID = 00 00 57h)

OVERVIEW

Stop controls are handled with the MIDI System Exclusive (Sysex) code and ID#. The data following the Sysex/ID codes consist of a Device ID (allowing for future sysex features), at least one Stop Group Code (explained below) followed by Stop Control Data bytes. Individual stop changes are handled with a single Stop Control Group. As many groups of Stop Control Data are used as required to cover the full stop list of an organ. Stop Control Groups must always be the 5 byte (stop group code + 4 data bytes) block but can be truncated with an EOX (End Of Exclusive). This allows changing manuals and/or jumping groups on the fly.

The MIDI controller will check for key on/off activity between Stop Control Groups and handle that key data before finishing stop data. If there is key data activity an End Of Exclusive (EOX) is sent, then the required status byte and data for those keys. The Sysex is returned to in the normal way to finish stop controls if needed.

A single Stop Group Code/Stop Control Data block consists of a 5 byte header, a Stop Group Code, 4 data bytes and an EOX byte. This is a total of 11 bytes which requires 3.52 mS. Additional Stop Group Code/Data blocks could follow without re-sending the header if no keys need to be handled and would take 1.6 mS. each. A general piston on a combination action of a large 3 manual organ may require 14-16 Stop Group Code/Data blocks (to handle 100 stops) which would take 25.9 - 29.1 mS. A stop registration change such as this would produce no noticeable delay. Sending 10 key changes (on and off) between these stop groups would cause a 42.2 mS delay from the 1st to the last stop, but only 13.1 mS. delay in the keys.

STOP GROUP CODE DEFINITION

The Stop Group Code is a prefix to Stop Control Data bytes and identifies which manual (division) and subgroup the stop data belongs with. This byte will always have a 0 in the Most Significant Bit (MSB). The next 4 bits will identify a subgroup of the stop bit map. This provides 16 subgroups. The 3 Least Significant Bits (LSB) will identify the manual (division). The manual numbers match the default assignments (1 = Sw., 2 = Gt., etc.).

A Stop Group Code precedes each 4 byte data group (block) of stop data. This permits 16 subgroups times 28 stop bits (7 bits X 4 bytes) = 448 stops maximum per division.

The Stop Group Code byte format is as follows:

0ssssmmm

ssss = subgroup permitting 16 subgroups

mmm = manual (division) permitting 8 that match the default manual (division) assignments

Note: The subgroup can also be thought of as a group offset value.

STOP CONTROL DATA DEFINITION

The stop control data bytes will always have a zero (0) in the MSB to distinguish them as data bytes. Each of the remaining 7 bits represents one stop (stop position). This provides 7 stops per byte for a total of 28 stops (positions) per 4 byte block. The individual bit values will be: 1 = on; 0 = off. These bits represent a bit map of the Peterson Universal Stop List (Map). Physical stops read in the stop input matrix will be assigned a position in this (logical) map.

Only the blocks and data bytes in which a stop change occurred need to be sent. If a stop change occurred on Universal Stop #63 of a particular division only the first 2 bytes of the 3rd block needs to be sent. Groups can only be truncated by an EOX. When a block is truncated it will be assumed that no change occurred in the remaining bytes.

Example: 7. 0.07 4' Octave (Principal)

LEGEND

7. = Assigned (logical) number

0 = Stop Subgroup

07 = 7th bit (of 1st byte)

4' = The Pitch

Octave = Stop Name

(Principal) = Alternate stop name(s)

Hence, the Great 4' Octave would be coded (in hex) as:

F0 00 00 57 01 ; Begin Sysex, ID, device ID

01 01 00 00 00 F7 ; Subgroup code, data to turn stop on, EOX.

F0 00 00 57 01 ; Header

01 00 00 00 00 F7 ; would then turn it off.

A code of:

F0 00 00 57 01 ;

09 01 26 07 78 ; turns on 11 great stops, one per true bit.

11 10 F7 ; note the next subgroup code for the next ; group of data & group truncated by EOX

A code of:

F0 00 00 57 01 ;

00 01 02 04 08 ; turns on 4 swell stops

30 00 00 C0 0A ; jumps groups & does 4 more swell stops

0A 20 10 0F 0D F7 ; then switches manuals & does 9 choir stops

PETERSON UNIVERSAL STOP LIST (MAP)

Each physical organ stop control will have a pre-assigned stop name and pitch from the Peterson Universal Stop List (MAP). The stops on any particular organ will be assigned to their corresponding logical bit in the appropriate division stop group, thus making MIDI files interchangeable between organs of any size and stop list. Even files made on a theater organ could be used on a classical organ or vice versa.

Most frequently used stop controls/pitches will be in the first (0) stop subgroup and the least used will be in the 8th subgroup. Subgroups 9-11 are used for Fast Config. assignments. Subgroups 12-16 would be used for unique stops/controls that would not likely translate to any another organ specification. Consult Peterson on the use of these un-assigned subgroups to avoid conflicts in compatible files. Channel 7(8) is reserved for encoding general couplers and piston data. A means of masking and/or disabling the piston data should be provided as piston changes are not likely compatible from organ to organ. Piston bits should only be used if compatibility is not required and where visual (or mechanically moving) stop control from

a combination action is desired or from an assigned receive program change. An alternate method of encoding/decoding pistons (as stops) using subgroups 12-16 is preferred.

The Universal Stop List (MAP) begins below and is broken down by subgroups showing prioritizing. There are currently 207 stop controls with 296 stop names (including alternates) provided for in this list. These utilize 8 subgroups. Additional stop controls and/or alternate names can be added. There are 17 un-assigned bits in the 1-8 subgroups and most of the bits in subgroups 12-16 for this purpose. Bear in mind that this list is re-used for each of 7 divisions, so a 1358 stop organ could be accommodated.

An example/legend is provided at the beginning of the Universal Stop List (MAP) below that explains the format used.

PETERSON UNIVERSAL STOP LIST (MAP)

Example: 65. 2.09 8' DULCIANA (AEOLINE)

LEGEND

65 = Assignment number

2 = Stop Subgroup

09 = Second bit of 2nd byte

8' = Pitch

DULCIANA = Stop name

(AEOLINE) = Alternate stop name(s)

143. 5.03 64' GRAVISSIMA

142. 5.02 32' OPEN DIAPASON (FLUTE OUVERTE)

141. 5.01 32' PRINCIPAL

136. 4.24 32' CONTRA VIOLONE

95. 3.11 32' CONTRA BOURDON

135. 4.23 32' CONTRA BOMBARDE (DIAPHONE)

134. 4.22 32' CONTRA FAGOTTO

54. 1.26 32' RESULTANT

96. 3.12 16' OPEN DIAPASON (DIAPHONIC DIAPASON, FLUTE OUVERTE)

10. 0.10 16' PRINCIPAL (MONTRE)

128. 4.16 16' CONTRA BASS

129. 4.17 16' VIOLONE

11. 0.11 16' BOURDON (SUBBASS, TIBIA CLAUSA)

97. 3.13 16' GEMSHORN (SPITZFLUTE)

98. 3.14 16' GAMBA

12. 0.12 16' LIEBLICH GEDACKT

99. 3.15 16' QUINTATON (ROHR BOURDON)

130. 4.18 16' BOMBARDE (OPHECLIEDE)

131. 4.19 16' TROMBONE (POSAUNE, DIAPHONE)

137. 4.25 16' TUBA

13. 0.13 16' FAGOTTO (BASSON, HAUTBOIS, OBOE, OBOE HORN)

14. 0.14 16' TRUMPET (TROMPETTE)

132. 4.20 16' DULZIAN (CLARINET)

133. 4.21 16' TROMPETTE-EN-CHAMADE

219. 7.23 16' SAXOPHONE

220. 7.24 16' BRASS TRUMPET

221. 7.25 16' ENGLISH POST HORN

108. 3.24 16' VOX HUMANA

109. 3.25 16' RESULTANT

100. 3.16 10 2/3' GROSS QUINTE

113. 4.01 8' STENTORPHONE (GRAND DIAPASON, DIAPHONIC DIAPASON)

57. 2.01 8' OPEN DIAPASON (1st OPEN DIAPASON)

1. 0.01 8' PRINCIPAL (2nd OPEN DIAPASON)

58. 2.02 8' GEIGEN PRINCIPAL (3rd OPEN DIAPASON, VIOLIN DIAPASON)

59. 2.03 8' FLUTE MAJOR (GROSS FLUTE, SOLO TIBIA CLAUSA, TIBIA CLAUSA)

2. 0.02 8' BOURDON (2nd FLUTE)

60. 2.04 8' FLUTE HARMONIQUE (CONCERT FLUTE, MELODIA, HOHLFLUTE)

61. 2.05 8' GEDACKT (STOPPED DIAPASON, CHIMNEY FLUTE, ROHRFLUTE)

62. 2.06 8' QUINTADE (QUINTADENA)

3. 0.03 8' VIOLA (VIOL DA GAMBA, VIOL D. ORCHESTRE, GEMSHORN)

4. 0.04 8' VIOLA CELESTE (GEMSHORN CELESTE)

63. 2.07 8' SALICIONAL

64. 2.08 8' VOIX CELESTE

114. 4.02 8' FLAUTO DOLCE (ERZAHLER)

115. 4.03 8' FLUTE CELESTE (ERZAHLER CELESTE)

65. 2.09 8' DULCIANA (AEOLINE)

116. 4.04 8' UNDA MARIS (AEOLINE CELESTE)

66. 2.10 8' TUBA (TROMBA, HARMONIC TUBA, TUBA MIRABILIS)

5. 0.05 8' TRUMPET (TROMPETTE, CORNOPEAN, BRASS TRUMPET)

6. 0.06 8' OBOE (FAGOT, HAUTBOIS, BASSON, ORCHESTRAL OBOE, OBOE HORN)

67. 2.11 8' HARMONIC TRUMPET (TROMPETTE HARMONIQUE)

68. 2.12 8' FRENCH HORN (CORNO DI BASSETTO, COR D' ORCHESTRE)

117. 4.05 8' ENGLISH HORN (COR D' ANGLAIS)

69. 2.13 8' CLARINET (KRUMMHORN, CROMORNE)

70. 2.14 8' VOX HUMANA (VOIX HUMAINE)

118. 4.06 8' TROMPETTE-EN-CHAMADE (TROMPETTE REAL, FANFARE TRUMPET)

159. 5.19 8' ENGLISH POST HORN

160. 5.20 8' KRUMMET (KRUMMHORN, KORNET)

161. 5.21 8' SERPENT

162. 5.22 8' MUSETTE

163. 5.23 8' SOLO VOX HUMANA

164. 5.24 8' SAXOPHONE (BRASS SAXOPHONE)

165. 5.25 8' KINURA

71. 2.15 5 1/3' QUINT

119. 4.07 5 1/3' QUINT TROMPETTE

7. 0.07 4' OCTAVE

72. 2.16 4' PRINCIPAL

73. 2.17 4' PRESTANT

110. 3.26 4' GEIGEN OCTAVE

8. 0.08 4' CHIMNEY FLUTE (ROHR FLUTE, KOPPEL FLOTE)

74. 2.18 4' GEDACKT (BOURDON, TIBIA)

75. 2.19 4' SPITZ FLUTE (SPITZ PRINCIPAL, GEMSHORN)

76. 2.20 4' OPEN FLUTE (NACHTHORN, WALDFLOTE)

77. 2.21 4' HARMONIC FLUTE (FLUTE TRAVERSO, ZAUBERFLOTE, CONCERT FLUTE)

120. 4.08 4' FUGARA (VIOLINA)

78. 2.22 4' SALICET

121. 4.09 4' CELESTE

79. 2.23 4' GAMBETTE

122. 4.10 4' CELESTINA

80. 2.24 4' DULCET

123. 4.11 4' CELESTE

85. 3.01 4' HARMONIC TUBA (HARMONIC CLARION)

9. 0.09 4' CLARION

86. 3.02 4' CHALUMEAU (ROHR SCHALMEI)

87. 3.03 4' OBOE (FAGOT, HAUTBOIS)

124. 4.12 4' TROMPETTE EN CHAMADE

125. 4.13 3 1/5' GROSS TIERCE

23. 0.23 2 2/3' QUINTE (TWELFTH)

88. 3.04 2 2/3' NAZARD

21. 0.21 2' PRINCIPAL (FIFTEENTH)

89. 3.05 2' SPITZ FLUTE (SPITZ PRINCIPAL)

22. 0.22 2' BLOCK FLUTE (PICCOLO)

90. 3.06 2' HARMONIC PICCOLO

126. 4.14 2' KORNET

24. 0.24 1 3/5' TIERCE (TERZ)

29. 1.01 1 1/3' QUINT (LARIGOT)

127. 4.15 1 1/7' SEPTIEME

91. 3.07 1' SIFFLOTE (FIFE)

145. 5.04 2/3' QUINT

146. 5.05 HARMONICS

147. 5.06 FULL MIXTURE

30. 1.02 FOURNITURE

31. 1.03 SHARFF

92. 3.08 CYMBAL

147. 5.07 ACUTA

32. 1.04 SESQUIALTERA

93. 3.09 CORNET

94. 3.10 SEPTERZ

53. 1.25 II MIXTURE

25. 0.25 III MIXTURE

26. 0.26 IV MIXTURE

20. 0.20 TREMULANT I-FAST (PRIMARY OR FIRST)

148. 5.08 TREMULANT II-SLOW

171. 6.03 TREMULANT MAIN A

172. 6.04 TREMULANT MAIN B

173. 6.05 TREMULANT TIBIA

174. 6.06 TREMULANT VOX

175. 6.07 TREMULANT BRASS

176. 6.08 TREMULANT REEDS

187. 6.19 GLOCK RE-IT

188. 6.20 XYLO RE-IT

189. 6.21 MARIMBA RE-IT

15. 0.15 16' SUB COUPLER

16. 0.16 8' UNISON COUPLER (UNISON OFF)

194. 6.26 5 1/3' QUINT COUPLER

17. 0.17 4' OCTAVE COUPLER

37. 1.09 16' SOLO TO X

38. 1.10 8' SOLO TO X

194. 6.26 5 1/3' SOLO TO X

39. 1.11 4' SOLO TO X

40. 1.12 16' SWELL TO X

41. 1.13 8' SWELL TO X

42. 1.14 4' SWELL TO X

43. 1.15 16' GREAT TO X

44. 1.16 8' GREAT TO X

45. 1.17 4' GREAT TO X

46. 1.18 16' CHOIR TO X

47. 1.19 8' CHOIR TO X

48. 1.20 4' CHOIR TO X

222. 7.26 PEDAL TO X

152. 5.12 ECHO ON X

153. 5.13 ANTIPHONAL ON X

154. 5.14 POSITIV ON X

34. 1.06 16' MIDI TO X

35. 1.07 8' MIDI TO X (MIDI ON/OFF)

36. 1.08 4' MIDI TO X

49. 1.21 16' MIDI A

50. 1.22 16' MIDI B

102. 3.18 16' MIDI C

103. 3.19 16' MIDI D

18. 0.18 8' MIDI A

19. 0.19 8' MIDI B

104. 3.20 8' MIDI C

105. 3.21 8' MIDI D

51. 1.23 4' MIDI A

52. 1.24 4' MIDI B

106. 3.22 4' MIDI C

107. 3.23 4' MIDI D

81. 2.25 8' MIDI MELODY

82. 2.26 4' MIDI MELODY

83. 2.27 16' MIDI BASS

84. 2.28 8' MIDI BASS

155. 5.15 MANUAL TRANSFER

156. 5.16 ALL SWELLS TO SWELL

157. 5.17 BASS COUPLER

158. 5.18 MELODY COUPLER

169. 6.01 PIZZICATTO COUPLER

170. 6.02 SOSTENUTO

181. 6.13 16' PIANO

182. 6.14 8' PIANO

183. 6.15 4' PIANO

184. 6.16 PIANO SUSTAIN

215. 7.19 REMOTE ORGAN ON/OFF

216. 7.20 REMOTE OCNSOLE ON/OFF

217. 7.21 LOCAL ORGAN ON/OFF

218. 7.22 LOCAL CONSOLE ON/OFF

33. 1.05 CHIMES

149. 5.09 HARP

150. 5.10 CELESTA

151. 5.11 CARILLON

185. 6.17 TOWER CHIMES

177. 6.09 MARIMBA HARP

178. 6.10 CHRYSOLGLOTT

179. 6.11 XYLOPHONE

180. 6.12 GLOCKENSPIEL

186. 6.18 TUNED SLEIGH BELLS

101. 3.17 ZIMBELSTERN

179. 6.23 GONG

180. 6.24 TRIANGLE

212. 7.16 SLEIGH BELLS

200. 7.04 CRASH CYMBAL

201. 7.05 TAP CYMBAL

202. 7.06 BRUSH CYMBAL

214. 7.18 FINGER CYMBAL

203. 7.07 SNARE DRUM

199. 7.03 BASS DRUM

204. 7.08 SNARE DRUM ROLL

205. 7.09 TOM TOM

206. 7.10 TYMPANI

207. 7.11 TAMBORINE

208. 7.12 CASTINETS

209. 7.13 CHINESE BLOCK

210. 7.14 WOOD BLOCK

211. 7.15 SAND BLOCK

197. 7.01 STEAMBOAT WHISTLE

198. 7.02 BIRD WHISTLE

190. 6.22 SIREN

213. 7.17 GLADSTONE AFTERBEAT

225. 8.01 SWELL SHADE 1

226. 8.02 SWELL SHADE 2

227. 8.03 SWELL SHADE 3

228. 8.04 SWELL SHADE 4

229. 8.05 SWELL SHADE 5

230. 8.06 SWELL SHADE 6

231. 8.07 SWELL SHADE 7

232. 8.08 SWELL SHADE 8

233. 8.09 SWELL SHADE 9

234. 8.10 SWELL SHADE 10

235. 8.11 SWELL SHADE 11

236. 8.12 SWELL SHADE 12

237. 8.13 SWELL SHADE 13

238. 8.14 SWELL SHADE 14

239. 8.15 SWELL SHADE 15

240. 8.16 SWELL SHADE 16

241. 8.17 SWELL SHADE 17

242. 8.18 SWELL SHADE 18

243. 8.19 SWELL SHADE 19

244. 8.20 SWELL SHADE 20

245. 8.21 SWELL SHADE 21

246. 8.22 SWELL SHADE 22

247. 8.23 SWELL SHADE 23

248. 8.24 SWELL SHADE 24

249. 8.25 SWELL SHADE 25

250. 8.26 SWELL SHADE 26

251. 8.27 SWELL SHADE 27

252. 8.28 SWELL SHADE 28





The following is a duplicate Universal Stop List (MAP) that has been sorted by it's assignment (sysex subgroup) numbers. Use for checking assigned stops.

1. 0.01 8' PRINCIPAL (2nd OPEN DIAPASON)

2. 0.02 8' BOURDON (2nd FLUTE)

3. 0.03 8' VIOLA (VIOL DA GAMBA, VIOL D. ORCHESTRE, GEMSHORN)

4. 0.04 8' VIOLA CELESTE (GEMSHORN CELESTE)

5. 0.05 8' TRUMPET (TROMPETTE, CORNOPEAN, BRASS TRUMPET)

6. 0.06 8' OBOE (FAGOT, HAUTBOIS, BASSON, ORCHESTRAL OBOE,OBOE HORN)

7. 0.07 4' OCTAVE

8. 0.08 4' CHIMNEY FLUTE (ROHR FLUTE, KOPPEL FLUTE)

9. 0.09 4' CLARION

10. 0.10 16' PRINCIPAL (MONTRE)

11. 0.11 16' BOURDON (SUBBASS, TIBIA CLAUSA)

12. 0.12 16' LIEBLICH GEDACKT

13. 0.13 16' FAGOTTO (BASSON, HAUTBOIS, OBOE, OBOE HORN)

14. 0.14 16' TRUMPET (TROMPETTE)

15. 0.15 16' SUB COUPLER

16. 0.16 8' UNISON COUPLER (UNISON OFF)

17. 0.17 4' OCTAVE COUPLER

18. 0.18 8' MIDI A

19. 0.19 8' MIDI B

20. 0.20 TREMULANT I­FAST (PRIMARY OR FIRST)

21. 0.21 2' PRINCIPAL

22. 0.22 2' BLOCK FLUTE (PICCOLO)

23. 0.23 2 2/3' QUINTE

24. 0.24 1 3/5' TIERCE (TERZ)

25. 0.25 III MIXTURE

26. 0.26 IV MIXTURE

27. 0.27

28. 0.28

29. 1.01 1 1/3' QUINTE (LARIGOT)

30. 1.02 FOURNITURE

31. 1.03 SHARFF

32. 1.04 SESQUIALTERA

33. 1.05 CHIMES

34. 1.06 16' MIDI TO X

35. 1.07 8' MIDI TO X (MIDI ON/OFF)

36. 1.08 4' MIDI TO X

37. 1.09 16' SOLO TO X

38. 1.10 8' SOLO TO X

39. 1.11 4' SOLO TO X

40. 1.12 16' SWELL TO X

41. 1.13 8' SWELL TO X

42. 1.14 4' SWELL TO X

43. 1.15 16' GREAT TO X

44. 1.16 8' GREAT TO X

45. 1.17 4' GREAT TO X

46. 1.18 16' CHOIR TO X

47. 1.19 8' CHOIR TO X

48. 1.20 4' CHOIR TO X

49. 1.21 16' MIDI A

50. 1.22 16' MIDI B

51. 1.23 4' MIDI A

52. 1.24 4' MIDI B

53. 1.25 II MIXTURE

54. 1.26 32' RESULTANT

55. 1.27

56. 1.28

57. 2.01 8' OPEN DIAPASON (1st OPEN DIAPASON)

58. 2.02 8' GEIGEN PRINCIPAL (3rd OPEN DIAPASON, VIOLIN DIAPASON)

59. 2.03 8' FLUTE MAJOR (GROSS FLUTE, SOLO TIBIA CLAUSA, TIBIA)

60. 2.04 8' FLUTE HARMONIQUE (CONCERT FLUTE, MELODIA, HOHLFLUTE)

61. 2.05 8' GEDACKT (STOPPED DIAPASON, CHIMNEY FLUTE, ROHRFLUTE)

62. 2.06 8' QUINTADE (QUINTADENA)

63. 2.07 8' SALICIONAL

64. 2.08 8' VOIX CELESTE

65. 2.09 8' DULCIANA (AEOLINE)

66. 2.10 8' TUBA (TROMBA, HARMONIC TUBA, TUBA MIRABILIS)

67. 2.11 8' HARMONIC TRUMPET (TROMPETTE HARMONIQUE)

68. 2.12 8' FRENCH HORN (CORNO DI BASSETTO, COR D' ORCHESTRE)

69. 2.13 8' CLARINET (KRUMMHORN, CROMORNE)

70. 2.14 8' VOX HUMANA (VOIX HUMAINE)

71. 2.15 5 1/3' QUINT

72. 2.16 4' PRINCIPAL

73. 2.17 4' PRESTANT

74. 2.18 4' GEDACKT (BOURDON, TIBIA)

75. 2.19 4' SPITZ FLUTE (SPITZ PRINCIPAL, GEMSHORN)

76. 2.20 4' OPEN FLUTE (NACHTHORN, WALDFLOTE)

77. 2.21 4' HARMONIC FLUTE (FLUTE TRAVERSO, ZAUBERFLOTE, CONCERT FLUTE)

78. 2.22 4' SALICET

79. 2.23 4' GAMBETTE

80. 2.24 4' DULCET

81. 2.25 8' MIDI MELODY

82. 2.26 4' MIDI MELODY

83. 2.27 16' MIDI BASS

84. 2.28 8' MIDI BASS

85. 3.01 4' HARMONIC TUBA (HARMONIC CLARION)

86. 3.02 4' CHALUMEAU (ROHR SCHALMEI)

87. 3.03 4' OBOE (FAGOT, HAUTBOIS)

88. 3.04 2 2/3' NAZARD

89. 3.05 2' SPITZ FLUTE (SPITZ PRINCIPAL)

90. 3.06 2' HARMONIC PICCOLO

91. 3.07 1' SIFFLOTE (FIFE)

92. 3.08 CYMBAL

93. 3.09 CORNET

94. 3.10 SEPTERZ

95. 3.11 32' CONTRA BOURDON

96. 3.12 16' OPEN DIAPASON (DIAPHONIC DIAPASON, FLUTE OUVERTE)

97. 3.13 16' GEMSHORN (SPITZFLUTE)

98. 3.14 16' GAMBA

99. 3.15 16' QUINTATON (ROHR BOURDON)

100. 3.16 10 2/3' GROSS QUINTE

101. 3.17 ZIMBELSTERN

102. 3.18 16' MIDI C

103. 3.19 16' MIDI D

104. 3.20 8' MIDI C

105. 3.21 8' MIDI D

106. 3.22 4' MIDI C

107. 3.23 4' MIDI D

108. 3.24 16' VOX HUMANA

109. 3.25 16' RESULTANT

110. 3.26 4' GEIGEN OCTAVE

111. 3.27

112. 3.28

113. 4.01 8' STENTORPHONE (GRAND DIAPASON, DIAPHONIC DIAPASON)

114. 4.02 8' FLAUTO DOLCE (ERZAHLER)

115. 4.03 8' FLUTE CELESTE (ERZAHLER CELESTE)

116. 4.04 8' UNDA MARIS (AEOLINE CELESTE)

117. 4.05 8' ENGLISH HORN (COR D' ANGLAIS)

118. 4.06 8' TROMPETTE­EN­CHAMADE (TROMPETTE REAL, FANFARE TRUMPET)

119. 4.07 5 1/3' QUINT TROMPETTE

120. 4.08 4' FUGARA (VIOLINA)

121. 4.09 4' CELESTE

122. 4.10 4' CELESTINA

123. 4.11 4' CELESTE

124. 4.12 4' TROMPETTE EN CHAMADE

125. 4.13 3 1/5' GROSS TIERCE

126. 4.14 2' KORNET

127. 4.15 1 1/7' SEPTIEME

128. 4.16 16' CONTRE BASS

129. 4.17 16' VIOLONE

130. 4.18 16' BOMBARDE (OPHECLIEDE)

131. 4.19 16' TROMBONE (POSAUNE, DIAPHONE)

132. 4.20 16' DULZIAN (CLARINET)

133. 4.21 16' TROMPETTE­EN­CHAMADE

134. 4.22 32' CONTRA FAGOTTO

135. 4.23 32' CONTRA BOMBARDE (DIAPHONE)

136. 4.24 32' CONTRA VIOLONE

137. 4.25 16' TUBA

138. 4.26

139. 4.27

140. 4.28

141. 5.01 32' PRINCIPAL

142. 5.02 32' OPEN DIAPASON (FLUTE OUVERTE)

143. 5.03 64' GRAVISSIMA

144. 5.04 2/3' QUINT

145. 5.05 HARMONICS

146. 5.06 FULL MIXTURE

147. 5.07 ACUTA

148. 5.08 TREMULANT II­SLOW

149. 5.09 HARP

150. 5.10 CELESTA

151. 5.11 CARILLON

152. 5.12 ECHO ON X

153. 5.13 ANTIPHONAL ON X

154. 5.14 POSITIV ON X

155. 5.15 MANUAL TRANSFER

156. 5.16 ALL SWELLS TO SWELL

157. 5.17 BASS COUPLER

158. 5.18 MELODY COUPLER

159. 5.19 8' ENGLISH POST HORN

160. 5.20 8' KRUMMET

161. 5.21 8' SERPENT

162. 5.22 8' MUSETTE

163. 5.23 8' SOLO VOX HUMANA

164. 5.24 8' SAXOPHONE (BRASS SAXOPHONE)

165. 5.25 8' KINURA

166. 5.26

167. 5.27

168. 5.28

169. 6.01 PIZZICATO COUPLER

170. 6.02 SOSTENUTO

171. 6.03 TREMULANT MAIN A

172. 6.04 TREMULANT MAIN B

173. 6.05 TREMULANT TIBIA

174. 6.06 TREMULANT VOX

175. 6.07 TREMULANT BRASS

176. 6.08 TREMULANT REEDS

177. 6.09 MARIMBA HARP

178. 6.10 CHRYSOLGLOTT

179. 6.11 XYLOPHONE

180. 6.12 GLOCKENSPIEL

181. 6.13 16' PIANO

182. 6.14 8' PIANO

183. 6.15 4' PIANO

184. 6.16 PIANO SUSTAIN

185. 6.17 TOWER CHIMES

186. 6.18 TUNED SLEIGH BELLS

187. 6.19 GLOCK RE­IT

188. 6.20 XYLO RE­IT

189. 6.21 MARIMBA RE­IT

190. 6.22 SIREN

191. 6.23 GONG

192. 6.24 TRIANGLE

193. 6.25 5 1/3' QUINT COUPLER

194. 6.26 5 1/3' SOLO TO X

195. 6.27

196. 6.28

197. 7.01 STEAMBOAT WHISTLE

198. 7.02 BIRD WHISTLE

199. 7.03 BASS DRUM

200. 7.04 CRASH CYMBAL

201. 7.05 TAP CYMBAL

202. 7.06 BRUSH CYMBAL

203. 7.07 SNARE DRUM

204. 7.08 SNARE DRUM ROLL

205. 7.09 TOM TOM

206. 7.10 TYMPANI

207. 7.11 TAMBOURINE

208. 7.12 CASTANETS

209. 7.13 CHINESE BLOCK

210. 7.14 WOOD BLOCK

211. 7.15 SAND BLOCK

212. 7.16 SLEIGH BELLS

213. 7.17 GLADSTONE AFTERBEAT

214. 7.18 FINGER CYMBAL

215. 7.19 REMOTE ORGAN ON/OFF

216. 7.20 REMOTE CONSOLE ON/OFF

217. 7.21 LOCAL ORGAN ON/OFF

218. 7.22 LOCAL CONSOLE ON/OFF

219. 7.23 16' SAXOPHONE

220. 7.24 16' BRASS TRUMPET

221. 7.25 16' ENGLISH POST HORN

222. 7.26 PEDAL TO X

223. 7.27

224. 7.28

225. 8.01 SWELL SHADE 1

226. 8.02 SWELL SHADE 2

227. 8.03 SWELL SHADE 3

228. 8.04 SWELL SHADE 4

229. 8.05 SWELL SHADE 5

230. 8.06 SWELL SHADE 6

231. 8.07 SWELL SHADE 7

232. 8.08 SWELL SHADE 8

233. 8.09 SWELL SHADE 9

234. 8.10 SWELL SHADE 10

235. 8.11 SWELL SHADE 11

236. 8.12 SWELL SHADE 12

237. 8.13 SWELL SHADE 13

238. 8.14 SWELL SHADE 14

239. 8.15 SWELL SHADE 15

240. 8.16 SWELL SHADE 16

241. 8.17 SWELL SHADE 17

242. 8.18 SWELL SHADE 18

243. 8.19 SWELL SHADE 19

244. 8.20 SWELL SHADE 20

245. 8.21 SWELL SHADE 21

246. 8.22 SWELL SHADE 22

247. 8.23 SWELL SHADE 23

248. 8.24 SWELL SHADE 24

249. 8.25 SWELL SHADE 25

250. 8.26 SWELL SHADE 26

251. 8.27 SWELL SHADE 27

252. 8.28 SWELL SHADE 28

253. thru 448. UN-ASSIGNED




DEFINITIONS (Glossary of terms)

ANO (All Notes Off) - MIDI command(s) that transmits note off data.

Bank (Memory Bank) - Memory (data) storage area.

Basic Channel - MIDI channel that receives Mode Messages.

Channel (MIDI Channel) - One of 16 multiplexed data communication paths.

Control Change - MIDI command(s) that affect a voice module's or synthesizer's control parameters.

Controller - Device that transmits (sends) control commands.

Default - Vaules or parameters used in the absence of user input.

EOX (End of Exclusive) - Returns data handling from a manufacturers exclusive format to standard MIDI format.

File - Arrangement of related memory data in storage or on disk.

Format - Specific type of processing used.

Layer - One of several levels of information (data).

MAP - Detailed arrangement (placement) of data.

Memory Dump - Downloading (transferring) data from memory.

Merge(r) - Combining of data from two or more sources.

MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) - Equipment designed for exchanging information (musical notes, voice changes, expression, etc.) between different musical instruments.

MIDI Thru - Output that provides the same data as received in MIDI In.

Mode - A manner of usage.

Omni - A MIDI mode in which all channels are interpreted as one.

Patch - Means of producing or bringing together various parameters.

Pitch Bend - Method of altering the pitch (frequency) of a tone generating device.

Port - Term for data inputs and outputs.

Program Change - Synonymous with voice or registration change.

Real Time - Happening in actual true time, not delayed or altered in time from it's occurrence.

Running Status - Repeating of status messages is not required thus reducing transmitted data.

Sequencer - Device that records and replays (data) events for the purpose of reproducing a performance.

Sound Module/Synthesizer - Device that generates tones in response to MIDI data (musical notes, voice changes, expression, etc.).

Sysex (System Exclusive) - Format exclusively used by a manufacturer to handle NON-MIDI data/functions.



SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT and WARRANTY

The MIDI Resource System software (firmware) and documentation are owned by PETERSON ELECTRO MUSICAL PRODUCTS, Inc. and are protected by United States copyright laws and international treaty provisions. Therefore, you must treat the MIDI Resource System software (firmware) like any other copyrighted material.

You must not copy the software or written materials accompanying the software. The software (firmware) must not be used in any device other than the MIDI Resource System hardware that it was intended for. You may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the MIDI Resource System software (firmware).

Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc. grants the use of it's MIDI Resource System software (firmware) in the MIDI Resource System hardware that it was supplied with.

Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc. warrants the physical media (EPROM) in which the MIDI Resource System software is contained to be free from defects and shall replace any such defective media free of charge.

Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc. further agrees to provide any licensee of it's MIDI Resource System software (firmware) with any updated version(s) of the MIDI Resource System software for a period of one year. This upgrade agreement applies to the software (firmware) only and does not include shipping or installation costs and further requires the return of the software (firmware) that is being replaced.


WARRANTY

Effective October 1, 1987

Peterson warrants the equipment that it manufactures to be free from defects in material or workmanship under normal use for a period of ten(10) years from the date of the original shipment to the buyer unless otherwise specified in writing. (See exceptions to 10 Year Warranty). Peterson's sole obligation under this warranty shall be that upon the return of goods to the Peterson factory, transportation charges prepaid, Peterson will, at its option repair or replace any equipment which it deems to contain defective material or workmanship and will return the repaired or replaced equipment to buyer, transportation charges prepaid. Peterson shall have the sole right upon inspection of any item of equipment or part thereof, to determine whether or not the defect is covered by the terms of this warranty.

Peterson will also warrant all of its equipment in a particular installation against indirect lightning strikes. If the installation is considered as a high risk to lightning strikes it is required that certain precautionary installation procedures be followed. These procedures will be specified in writing by Peterson. It is the responsibility of the buyer to check with Peterson prior to the installation as to whether the installation is considered a high risk. This warranty is not valid in the case of direct lightning strikes. Peterson considers a direct strike when the building is physically damaged by the lightning strike. By electrical system damage Peterson is referring to electrical wiring, electrical panel, motors,etc., not other electronic equipment in the building. Peterson reserves the right to inspect the installation site, and Peterson's determination as to whether the proper installation procedures were followed will be final. Peterson's sole obligation under this warranty will be the same as listed above in its standard warranty.

This warranty shall not apply to any equipment, or part thereof, which has been repaired by others in such a manner that does not conform with the Peterson standard for quality and/or workmanship, or which has been improperly used, abused, altered, damaged, subjected to accident, flood, fire or acts of God; or on which any serial numbers have been altered, defaced or removed. Peterson will not be responsible for any dismantling, reassembly or reinstallation charges. This warranty is in lieu of any other warranties expressed or implied, including, without limitations, warranty for merchant-ability and fitness for particular purpose as well as all other representations made to the purchaser. No person is authorized to give any other warranties or to assume any other liabilities on behalf of Peterson unless made or assumed by Peterson in writing. Peterson will not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental or consequential damages claimed in connection with any rescission of the agreement by the buyer.

Peterson=s warranty does not include the Yamaha MDF2 or any other third party sequencer(s). These devices are covered by their manufacturer=s warranty.

Peterson's warranty, as here in above set forth, shall not be enlarged, diminished or affected by, and no obligations or liability shall arise or grow out of Peterson's rendering of technical advice or service in connection with buyer's order of goods furnished hereunder. The warranty gives you specific legal rights which may vary from state to state.


SUPPORT POLICY

Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc. will provide any necessary telephone support to aid in the sales, installation, set up/configuration, operation and service of the MIDI Resource SystemJ. This support extends to the interface with diode matrix relays, OrgaPlexJ relays, MSP-1000Jand Duo-SetJ combination actions manufactured by Peterson. This also includes software/operating questions beyond the scope of the manuals.

We are not able to support other manufacturers' equipment which may be connected to the MIDI Resource SystemJ. To the extent that we are familiar with another manufacturer's equipment, we will do our best to advise on its use with our MIDI interface system. However, due to the large number of MIDI synthesizers, sound modules, sequencers, patch bays, etc., we cannot support or answer questions on these devices or on their interconnection. We recommend that you direct questions to the manufacturer or distributor of the product of interest.

Note: The Peterson MIDI Resource SystemJ conforms to the MIDI Manufacturers Association, MIDI 1.0 Specification, Version 4.2 and will operate properly with other equipment that conforms to this specification (or earlier versions). Some equipment that conforms to this specification nevertheless may not recognize certain MIDI messages such as "Pitch Bend", Master Volume (expression), Sustain, Tremolo, Bank Select, etc..

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1

DETAILS OF MIDI Resource System™ OPERATION 2

OPTIONS AVAILABLE ON THE MAXIMUM MIDI Resource System™ 2

Expression Shoe(s) 2

Control Panel 2

DETAILS OF MIDI CONTROL PANEL DISPLAY 3

PROGRAM MODE 3

USE MODE 3

SHOW MODE 3

DETAILS OF MIDI CONTROL PANEL SWITCHES 4

1. Off/On/ANO 4

2. Prog/Use/Show 4

3. Channel Up/Down 4

4. Program Up/Down 4

5. Send/Receive 4

6. Tuning 4

7. Program Readout 4

8. Channel Readout 4

9. Manual Readout 5

PISTONS/MIDI PRESET STOPS 5

1. Setting 5

2. Recall 5

3. MIDI Cancel 6

MIDI IN/SEQUENCER OUT/INSTRUMENT OUT 6

SUSTAIN/SOSTENUTO 7

START/STOP/CONTINUE 7

TOUCH (VELOCITY) SENSITIVE CONTACTS 7

ADVANCED FEATURE CONTROL PANEL 7

Mode Select 7

Basic Channel Select 7

Start 7

Stop 7

Continue 8

Memory Select 8

Memory Level Readout 8

TRANSPOSER 8

EXTERNAL SEQUENCER 8

BANK SELECT 8

CHANNELS +8 FEATURE 8

ASSIGNING RECEIVE PROGRAM CHANGE VALUES 9

AUTO RESEND 9

DETAILS OF MIDI SEQUENCE FILES 9

Playback of pre-recorded sequence files 10

Recording or making of sequence files 10

Peterson Stop Control Format 11

Allen Organ Company Format 11

Rodgers Instrument Corporation Format 11

Stop Control Assignment 12

Advanced Sequencing 13

MIDI IMPLEMENTATION DETAILS 14

MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART 15

DESCRIPTION OF PETERSON SYSEX FORMAT 16

OVERVIEW 16

STOP GROUP CODE DEFINITION 16

PETERSON Universal Stop List (MAP) 17

DEFINITIONS (Glossary of terms) 26

SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT 27

WARRANTY 27

SUPPORT POLICY 28

D:\WP51\FILES\INS\MIDI_OP.INS Text Revised March 27, 1996